The Story of Maths BBC Doc Episode 4

 

The Story of Maths is a four-part British television series outlining aspects of the history of mathematics. It was a co-production between the Open University and the BBC and aired in October 2008 on BBC Four. The material was written and presented by University of Oxford professor Marcus du Sautoy.[1] The consultants were the Open University academics Robin Wilson, professor Jeremy Gray and June Barrow-Green. Kim Duke is credited as series producer.[2]

The series comprised four programmes respectively titled: The Language of the UniverseThe Genius of the EastThe Frontiers of Space; and To Infinity and Beyond. Du Sautoy documents the development of mathematics covering subjects such as the invention of zero and the unproven Riemann hypothesis, a 150 year old problem for whose solution the Clay Mathematics Institute has offered a $1,000,000 prize. He escorts viewers through the subject’s history and geography. He examines the development of key mathematical ideas and shows how mathematical ideas underpin the world’s science, technology, and culture.

He starts his journey in ancient Egypt and finishes it by looking at current mathematics. Between he travels through BabylonGreeceIndiaChina, and the medieval Middle East. He also looks at mathematics in Europe and then in America and takes the viewers inside the lives of many of the greatest mathematicians

Advertisements

The Story of Maths BBC Doc Episode 3

 

 

The Story of Maths is a four-part British television series outlining aspects of the history of mathematics. It was a co-production between the Open University and the BBC and aired in October 2008 on BBC Four. The material was written and presented by University of Oxford professor Marcus du Sautoy.[1] The consultants were the Open University academics Robin Wilson, professor Jeremy Gray and June Barrow-Green. Kim Duke is credited as series producer.[2]

The series comprised four programmes respectively titled: The Language of the UniverseThe Genius of the EastThe Frontiers of Space; and To Infinity and Beyond. Du Sautoy documents the development of mathematics covering subjects such as the invention of zero and the unproven Riemann hypothesis, a 150 year old problem for whose solution the Clay Mathematics Institute has offered a $1,000,000 prize. He escorts viewers through the subject’s history and geography. He examines the development of key mathematical ideas and shows how mathematical ideas underpin the world’s science, technology, and culture.

He starts his journey in ancient Egypt and finishes it by looking at current mathematics. Between he travels through BabylonGreeceIndiaChina, and the medieval Middle East. He also looks at mathematics in Europe and then in America and takes the viewers inside the lives of many of the greatest mathematicians

The Story of Maths BBC Doc Episode 1

The Story of Maths is a four-part British television series outlining aspects of the history of mathematics. It was a co-production between the Open University and the BBC and aired in October 2008 on BBC Four. The material was written and presented by University of Oxford professor Marcus du Sautoy.[1] The consultants were the Open University academics Robin Wilson, professor Jeremy Gray and June Barrow-Green. Kim Duke is credited as series producer.[2]
The series comprised four programmes respectively titled: The Language of the Universe; The Genius of the East; The Frontiers of Space; and To Infinity and Beyond. Du Sautoy documents the development of mathematics covering subjects such as the invention of zero and the unproven Riemann hypothesis, a 150 year old problem for whose solution the Clay Mathematics Institute has offered a $1,000,000 prize. He escorts viewers through the subject’s history and geography. He examines the development of key mathematical ideas and shows how mathematical ideas underpin the world’s science, technology, and culture.
He starts his journey in ancient Egypt and finishes it by looking at current mathematics. Between he travels through Babylon, Greece, India, China, and the medieval Middle East. He also looks at mathematics in Europe and then in America and takes the viewers inside the lives of many of the greatest mathematicians

Major Fraud – Who Wants To Be A Millionaire

 

FULL VIDEO of the WWTBAM unaired episode. Charles Ingram cheated his way to 1 million pounds sterling. This full episode is narrated by Martin Bashir.

Charles Ingram (born 6 August 1963) is a former British Army major who made headlines worldwide after he was accused of cheating in the game show Who Wants To Be A Millionaire? in 2001. He was convicted of deception, although he maintains that he did not cheat

Stolen wages

 

 

Stolen Wages

How low-wage restaurant workers in the US are fighting an uphill battle to be paid what they are owed.

 

In September 2012, about 20 restaurant workers protested in front of the popular David’s Cafe in Miami Beach, a restaurant owned by their former employer, Adrian Gonzalez.

They had all worked at David’s Cafe II prior to its closing in 2011 and were demanding over $70,000 in unpaid wages. After months of little action from authorities, including the department of labour and local agencies, they had few options but to take things into their own hands.

They decided to go on strike – a step that brought the issue of their low wages to the nation’s attention. And it is a scene that is playing out on streets across the US with increasing frequency as two-thirds of low-wage workers report some form of wage theft every week – whether that means being cheated out of hours worked, paid less than the minimum wage, or not being paid at all.

One study estimates that low-wage workers – over 30 million Americans – lose 15 percent of their income each year, the restaurant industry being one of the worst offenders.

According to the department of labour, 84 percent of sit-down restaurants inspected in the last three years were in violation of wage laws.

Meanwhile, in Washington, the food services industry is an organised and powerful opponent against increased minimum wage and workplace protections, spending millions of dollars each year to lobby against regulations and increased wages.