Hot Coffee

The McDonald’s coffee case has been routinely cited by the media as an example of how citizens have taken advantage of the legal system. We will show how this case became so popular in the media, who funded the effort and to what end. We will tell the truth and let the audience decide if spilling hot coffee is really as profitable as they might otherwise believe.

Vivian Maier, Who Took Nanny’s Pictures?

The incredible story of a mysterious nanny who died in 2009 leaving behind a secret hoard – thousands of stunning photographs. Never seen in her lifetime, they were found by chance in a Chicago storage locker and auctioned off cheaply.

Now Vivian Maier has gone viral and her magical pictures sell for thousands of dollars. Vivian was a tough street photographer, a secret poet of suburbia. In life she was a recluse, a hoarder, spinning tall tales about her French roots. Presented by Alan Yentob, the film includes stories from those who knew her and those who revealed her astonishing work.

Afghan Star Full Length Documentary

Afghan Star follows the story of Hameed Sakhizada, Setara Hussainzada, Rafi Naabzada, and Lema Sahar, four contestants appearing in the third season of the Afghan reality show Afghan Star. The show’s director and host Daoud Sediqi explains that it provides an opportunity for Afghans to enjoy music again after the Taliban’s ban. The contestants become national celebrities with people campaigning for votes which are cast via SMS. The show is popular among ordinary Afghan people and fans vote for their favorite contestants even across ethnic lines.

Shock doctrine

Naomi Klein’s much-acclaimed book “The Shock Doctrine” is the starting point for this strong documentary short that premiered in grand style at the 2007 Venice Film Festival. A collaboration with Alfonso and Jonás Cuarón.

The book argues that the free market policies of Nobel Laureate Milton Friedman have risen to prominence in some countries because of a deliberate strategy of certain leaders to exploit crises by pushing through controversial, exploitative policies while citizens were too busy emotionally and physically reeling from disasters or upheavals to create an effective resistance. It is implied that some man-made crises, such as the Iraq war, may have been created with the intention of pushing through these unpopular reforms in their wake.

The Death of Yugoslavia.

One of the most impressive documentary ever made. You live the facts that happened with the disgregation of Yugoslavia as if you were there. The war in Bosnia and the siege of Sarajevo are presented in a way that perhaps only BBC can do. A masterpiece. And a must, if you want to understand how things were and are in the Balkans.

The Gallipoli Catastrophe

 

The Gallipoli Campaign, also known as the Dardanelles Campaign or the Battle of Gallipoli or the Battle of Çanakkale (Turkish: Çanakkale Savaşı), took place on the Gallipoli peninsula (Gelibolu in modern Turkey) in the Ottoman Empire between 25 April 1915 and 9 January 1916, during World War I. Aiming to secure a sea route to Russia, the British and French launched a naval campaign to force a passage through the Dardanelles. After the naval operation, an amphibious landing was undertaken on the Gallipoli peninsula, to capture the Ottoman capital of Constantinople (Istanbul).[6] After eight months the land campaign also failed with many casualties on both sides, and the invasion force was withdrawn to Egypt.

The campaign was one of the greatest Ottoman victories during the war and is considered a major failure of the Allies. In Turkey, it is perceived as a defining moment in the nation’s history—a final surge in the defence of the motherland as the Ottoman Empire crumbled. The struggle formed the basis for the Turkish War of Independence and the founding of the Republic of Turkey eight years later under Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, a commander at Gallipoli. The campaign is often considered to mark the birth of national consciousness in Australia and New Zealand and the date of the landing 25 April, is known as “Anzac Day”. It remains the most significant commemoration of military casualties and veterans there, surpassing Remembrance Day (Armistice Day).